Frederick C Anderson

Frederick C Anderson

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Frederick was born on the 24th of March, 1842 in Boston, Massachusetts and was orphaned by the age of eight. His parents disappeared from public record meaning that they were more than likely deceased but he was then living in a workhouse called the House of Industry in South Boston. By 14, Frederick was sent on the Orphan Train, which sent orphan children from the cities to more rural areas and put to work. He was selected by a local farmer in Raynham where he then stayed until he enlisted in the Union Army in 1861.

Frederick was 19 years old four months after the Civil War started and he joined the 18th Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. He engaged in his battle one year after enlisting at the Second Battle of Bull Run and the 18th Massachusetts suffered its heaviest casualties of the war there. Frederick went on to fight in the Battle of Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, and Gettysburg. It was his actions on the 21st of August, 1864 during the Battle of Globe Tavern, that would earn him the Medal of Honor. The citation reads: “Capture of battle flag of 27th South Carolina (CSA) and the color bearer”.

On the 2nd of September, 1864, the 18th Massachusetts was disbanded and those who chose to reenlist or still had time left in their contract were merged into the 32nd Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, which included Frederick. One month after his actions, on the 13th of September, Frederick and several others were awarded the Medal of Honor by General Meade with the captured enemy flags on display. The 32nd Massachusetts was still engaged in the Siege of Petersburg in December when Frederick was wounded in the left foot. By January 31st, 1865, he had been in hospitals in City Point Virginia and Baltimore Maryland and rejoined his regiment. He also received a 45 day furlough as bonus for reenlisting and he returned from this just in time to watch the surrender of the Confederate Army  of Northern Virginia at Appomattox Court House.

After the war had ended, soldiers of the 32nd Massachusetts were mustered out of service and Frederick settled down in the town of Somerset and got married to Sarah Francis in 1866. They had three children and he worked at the Worcester Railroad freight yard in Providence, Rhode Island. Frederick C Anderson died suddenly at the age of 40 from a stroke and is buried in the Dighton Community Church Cemetery in Dighton, Massachusetts.

Marion T Anderson

Marion T Anderson

Everett W Anderson

Everett W Anderson